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Tuesday, January 16

Debunking Myths About Latin...

You’ve gotten the hang of this homeschooling thing…and then, you enter the high school years.  One of the changes is the addition of foreign language.  About half of families begin foreign language in the elementary years, while the other half wait until high school.  If you’re trying to decide which language to select, may I make the case for Latin?

Let’s look at some common misconceptions about Latin…
  • It isn’t practical.
I really have to laugh at this one!  Have you been to a doctor recently?  How about a lawyer?  Read any higher-level books recently?  Been to a church?  If you’ve done any of the three, then you’ve already been encountering Latin in daily use.  Maybe your student is interested in other Romance languages, but can’t decide which to choose…Latin is the foundation for Spanish, French, Portuguese, Italian, and Romansh.  Learn the one, and they’ll have a leg up on several.  

But maybe your student is just a struggling learner who has difficulty making sense of the English language.  Why on earth would you want to try and teach them another one?  (I had the same question with my struggling learner, with some amazing results.)  By getting that good foundation with words that they don’t know – thus having to really put the effort into paying attention – your student will come away with a better grasp of the English language and how it works.  They may not master the language, but you will see results in their English reading and writing abilities.
  • You should have begun teaching prior to high school.
While it’s true that exposing a child to a foreign language early on can be very beneficial for fluency, it isn’t really necessary with Latin.  Many families start in middle school – and that is when we began, as it helps to provide a strong grammar and language mechanics foundation.  Even if you wait until high school to begin, that same foundation is going to bolster ACT and SAT scores.  By then, too, your student’s brain will have developed enough to be ready for some of the more advanced reasoning skills needed for true success.  Don’t sweat it – start in ninth grade and put in the required two years…or three or four, for brownie points!
  • It’s only for the ‘smart kids.’
Are we really going to go down that road?  I like to tell my kids that “it’s only easy if you know it,” and Latin is no exception.  All learning requires determination, but if you’re interested in learning something, you’ll make the effort.  I would argue that Latin can be a big boon to the below-average student, particularly those struggling with language arts, as it will help to provide a stronger grammar and language usage foundation than the typical English class.  Maybe it’s not the ‘smart kids’ that make up a Latin class….maybe it’s the class that turns them into the ‘smart(er) kids.’
  • It’s a dead language.
Well…not in this house.  We actually have a book called How to Insult, Abuse, and Insinuate in Classical Latin.  I kid you not…it is the most popular book in our car (that would be – books that stay in the car for those “are we there yet?” days).  It’s true that Latin is usually an unspoken language, but my children wield their Latin phrases like swords against each other!  And, (ducking my head), they’ve even been known to insult others in Latin, too.  Thankfully, said folks were unawares.  My point is, it’s NOT a dead language if you don’t want it to be.  You can choose to get caught up in the (unfounded) stereotype that Latin is boring and drudgery, or you can choose to make it fun!


Click on the pics below to find out Why We Teach Elementary Latin and to access some of our favorite Latin resources!
 Why We Teach Elementary Latin Resources

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