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Monday, November 3

Thanksgiving Song (Adam Sandler)


Better lucky than good...

November 1st was the start of turkey season, and my hubby did us proud by taking down two turkeys with one shot!!  Here is a tutorial for cleaning that turkey, from start to finish.  If you're squeamish, you may want to skip today's post.
We began by pulling out a washable table and laying them out.  While they were still warm (it's easier then), we plucked out all of the feathers. 
We also cut off the wings and placed them in an area where the bugs can eat any tiny bits of meat leftover.  In a few weeks, they will be ready to use for adornments / crafts / etc.  I'm sure my little costume & set designer has a million ideas already...

Next, we cut off the feet.  I'm sure that there are folks that use these for stew or whatnot, but we tossed them out.

Getting Down to the Meat of Things

After plucking the feathers and removing the larger pieces, we sliced through the skin to get to the meat.  Starting with the breast area, we completely removed the skin, and then cut out the organ meats.  Again, the organ meats can be used for stew, but we served them as a special treat to our faithful barn kitties.
At this point, we were at a point where we needed to start restoring cleanliness, just for hygiene's sake.  I recommend you putting that big table away from the house, and someplace where you can use cleanser and spray water, liberally.  We placed a large bucket by the table to collect stray feathers, bones, and other innards.



Meet Fred, the first of the turkeys to be fully cleaned.  Sam came next.  After thoroughly cleaning the meat, I took them inside to butcher them and prepare them for the freezer.  Guess who's having fresh, wild-caught turkey this Thanksgiving???

Today's Trivia :

“Over the River and Through the Woods” is a Thanksgiving song by Lydia Maria Child . According to Wikipedia this song was written in 1844, originally as a poem with the title, "A Boy's Thanksgiving Day."
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